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The First Breeding Bird Atlas of Vermont (1976-1981)

Versão mais recente publicado por Vermont Center for Ecostudies em Dec 30, 2019 Vermont Center for Ecostudies

The Vermont Breeding Bird Atlas (VBBA) is one of the most comprehensive bird surveys in Vermont. It is completed once every 25 years during a 5-year period. Data collection for the first and second atlases were in 1976-1981 and in 2003-2007, respectively. The main goal of the first atlas was to document the spatial distribution of each bird species at a broad geographical scale.

Registros de Dados

Os dados deste recurso de ocorrência foram publicados como um Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A), que é o formato padronizado para compartilhamento de dados de biodiversidade como um conjunto de uma ou mais tabelas de dados. A tabela de dados do núcleo contém 24,218 registros.

Este IPT armazena os dados e, portanto, serve como um repositório de dados. Os dados e os metadados do recurso estão disponíveis para download no seção de downloads. A tabela de versões lista outras versões do recurso que foram disponibilizadas ao público e permite o rastreamento das alterações realizadas no recurso ao longo do tempo.

Downloads

Baixe a última versão do recurso de dados, como um Darwin Core Archive (DwC-A) ou recurso de metadados, como EML ou RTF:

Dados como um arquivo DwC-A download 24,218 registros em English (859 KB) - Frequência de atualização: não plenejado
Metadados como um arquivo EML download em English (12 KB)
Metadados como um arquivo RTF download em English (13 KB)

Versões

A tabela abaixo mostra apenas versões de recursos que são publicamente acessíveis.

Como citar

Pesquisadores deveriam citar esta obra da seguinte maneira:

Renfrew R, McFarland K (2019): The First Breeding Bird Atlas of Vermont (1976-1981). v1.0. Vermont Center for Ecostudies. Dataset/Occurrence. http://ipt.vtecostudies.org/ipt-2.3.5/resource?r=vtbreedingbirdatlas1&v=1.0

Direitos

Pesquisadores devem respeitar a seguinte declaração de direitos:

O editor e o detentor dos direitos deste trabalho é Vermont Center for Ecostudies. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC-BY-NC) 4.0 License.

GBIF Registration

Este recurso foi registrado no GBIF e atribuído ao seguinte GBIF UUID: eba1cb5d-eafe-4828-99c4-e9f53f14d7bc.  Vermont Center for Ecostudies publica este recurso, e está registrado no GBIF como um publicador de dados aprovado por U.S. Geological Survey.

Palavras-chave

Occurrence; Observation

Contatos

Quem criou esse recurso:

Rosalind Renfrew
Ornithologist
Vermont Center for Ecostudies PO Box 420 05055 Norwich Vermont US
Kent McFarland
conservation biologist
Vermont Center for Ecostudies PO Box 420 05055 Norwich Vermont US 802-649-1431

Quem pode responder a perguntas sobre o recurso:

Kent McFarland
conservation biologist
Vermont Center for Ecostudies PO Box 420 05055 Norwich Vermont US 802-649-1431

Quem preencher os metadados:

Kent McFarland
conservation biologist
Vermont Center for Ecostudies PO Box 420 05055 Norwich Vermont US 802-649-1431

Quem mais foi associado com o recurso:

Usuário
Kent McFarland
conservation biologist
Vermont Center for Ecostudies PO Box 420 05055 Norwich Vermont US 802-649-1431

Cobertura Geográfica

State of Vermont, United States

Coordenadas delimitadoras Sul Oeste [42.715, -73.455], Norte Leste [45.058, -71.389]

Cobertura Taxonômica

Nenhuma descrição disponível

Class  Aves (birds)

Cobertura Temporal

Data Inicial / Data final 1976-01-01 / 1981-12-31

Dados Sobre o Projeto

http://val.vtecostudies.org/

Título Vermont Atlas of Life
Identificador VAL
Descrição da Área de Estudo State of Vermont, USA

O pessoal envolvido no projeto:

Pesquisador Principal
Kent McFarland

Métodos de Amostragem

In the first atlas (1976-1981), one block in each quadrangle in Vermont was randomly selected to be surveyed—these were called “priority blocks.” A total of 179 blocks were selected to be surveyed in the first atlas. Field work for the first atlas was carried out during 1976 - 1981. Each block was surveyed for 1 to 5 years, depending on the amount of effort expended on a block in a given year. Blocks without a dedicated volunteer were block-busted; that is, surveyed intensively during a short period, usually by at least two people per block. Blockbusting was carried out by both volunteers and paid field technicians. In addition to observations collected during formal atlasing efforts, incidental observations were recorded and were especially encouraged for rare species in non-priority and priority blocks. The protocol for surveying a block followed that of other atlases and was in accordance with the general principles outlined in the North American Atlas Committee (NORAC) guidelines. Atlasers conducted extensive area searches of each block in all of the habitats represented. They recorded all bird species detected within safe dates and any breeding evidence observed for each bird species. Evidence of breeding was categorized as “Confirmed”, “Probable”, or “Possible”. A minimum number of species and confirmations were required to declare a block “completed.” This approach ensures a standard, minimum amount of coverage and survey effort on blocks. Observers were required to survey in as many different habitat types as possible on the block. Using a minimum number of species, while imprecise, is preferable to using the amount of time spent on a block as a measure of effort. The latter is problematic because the amount of time needed to survey a block adequately can vary depending on factors such as topography, habitat complexity and diversity, accessibility of habitats, times periods when surveying occurs, and especially skill level and motivation of the observer. In the first atlas, surveying on a block was considered complete when at least 75 percent of the species expected to occur in the block were found, and evidence of nesting was confirmed for at least half of those species. Based on an assumption that the average block in Vermont harbors 100 breeding bird species, a block was considered complete when at least 75 species had been documented, and at least 35 of those species were confirmed breeding. The 75/35 rule could not be strictly applied to blocks with relatively homogenous habitat. Forested blocks with few openings or wetlands, for example, do not have a diversity of habitats adequate to support 100 breeding bird species. Most of these blocks were located in the Northeastern Highlands biophysical region and in blocks in the Green Mountains, where blocks were extensively forested and supported few other habitat types.

Área de Estudo State of Vermont, United States

Descrição dos passos do método:

  1. See Sampling description.
  2. Because no database existed for the atlas, custom software was created by Ted Murin, atlas volunteer, to read scans of the species maps on pages 31-407 of the Atlas of Breeding Birds of Vermont (Laughlin, Sarah B. and Douglas P. Kibbe, eds. 1985. The Atlas of the Breeding Birds of Vermont. Hanover, NH: University Press of New England. 456pp. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11449779.v1). Original paper forms from the atlas are stored at the Vermont Center for Ecostudies. This file was used to created a DwC file for the project.

Citações bibliográficas

  1. Laughlin, Sarah B. and Douglas P. Kibbe, eds. 1985. The Atlas of the Breeding Birds of Vermont. Hanover, NH: University Press of New England. 456pp. https://doi.org/10.6084/m9.figshare.11449779.v1
  2. Breeding Bird Atlas Explorer (online resource). 2020. U.S. Geological Survey Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. <Date of access>. http://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bba. Data extracted from: Laughlin, Sarah B. and Douglas P. Kibbe, eds. 1985. The Atlas of the Breeding Birds of Vermont. Hanover, IN: University Press of New England. 456pp. https://www.pwrc.usgs.gov/bba/index.cfm?fa=explore.ProjectHome&BBA_ID=VT1976

Metadados Adicionais

Identificadores alternativos http://ipt.vtecostudies.org/ipt-2.3.5/resource?r=vtbreedingbirdatlas1